University of Maryland

College of Agriculture & Natural Resources

Environmental Science & Technology

Brian Needelman

Associate Professor

bneed@umd.edu
301-405-8227

Department of Environmental Science and Technology
0204 H. J. Patterson Hall
College Park, MD 20742

Section

Biography
Biography: 
Area of Specialization
  • Applying the concepts and tools of pedology to solve environmental problems.
  • Soil formation processes in tidal wetland soils including organic matter accumulation and decomposition, greenhouse gas fluxes, wetland elevation dynamics and sustainability in the face of sea-level rise and other climate change factors, and carbon crediting schemes.
  • Soil formation and variation effects on nutrient and sediment fate and transport in agricultural landscapes.
  • Integrated environmental and social science research to implement change.
Education: 
  • B.I.S in International Studies from School for International Training, Brattleboro, VT, 1993.
  • M.S. in Agronomy - Soils from the University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 1997.
  • Ph.D. in Soil Science (Pedology) from Penn State, University Park, PA, 2002.
Teaching
Courses Taught: 

ENST 301 Field Soil Morphology I (1 credit, fall semesters, instructor alternates years with Dr. Martin Rabenhorst)
This is a field-oriented course that introduces students to the techniques used to (1) describe soil morphology, and site and profile characteristics, (2) make land use interpretations based on soil characteristics, and (3) classify soils. This class is designed to prepare students for the Regional Collegiate Soil Judging Contest and for students to gain experience in the description and interpretation of soils in the field.

ENST 302 Field Soil Morphology II (1 credit, fall semesters, instructor alternates years with Dr. Martin Rabenhorst)
This is the second field-oriented course in a three course sequence that provides intermediate training for students in the techniques used to (1) describe soil morphology, and site and profile characteristics, (2) make land use interpretations based on soil characteristics, and (3) classify soils. This class is designed to prepare students for the Regional Collegiate Soil Judging Contest and for students to gain experience in the description and interpretation of soils in the field.

ENST 303 Field Soil Morphology III (1 credit, fall semesters, instructor alternates years with Dr. Martin Rabenhorst)
This is the third field-oriented course in a three course sequence that provides intermediate training for students in the techniques used to (1) describe soil morphology, and site and profile characteristics, (2) make land use interpretations based on soil characteristics, and (3) classify soils. This class is designed to prepare students for the Regional Collegiate Soil Judging Contest and for students to gain experience in the description and interpretation of soils in the field.

ENST 309 Advanced Field Soil Morphology (1 credit, spring semesters, instructor alternates years with Dr. Martin Rabenhorst)
This is a field-oriented course that provides advanced training for introduces students to in the techniques used to (1) describe soil morphology, and site and profile characteristics, (2) make land use interpretations based on soil characteristics, and (3) classify soils. This class is designed to prepare students for the National Collegiate Soil Judging Contest and for students to gain experience in the description and interpretation of soils in the field. Students will be exposed to a variety of soil landscapes and geology from outside of the northeastern U.S.

ENST 414: Soil Morphology Genesis and Classification (4 credits; fall semesters)
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ENST200 (formerly NRSC200). Credit will be granted for only one of the following: NRSC414 or ENST414. Formerly NRSC414. Processes and factors of soil genesis. Taxonomy of soils of the world by U.S. System. Soil morphological characteristics, composition, classification, survey and field trips to examine and describe soils.

ENST 472 Capstone II (3 credits; spring semesters)
This course is the second in a two-part series. Students will continue work on projects proposed and begun in ENST471. Focus on professional project preparation, presentation, critical evaluation on environmental science research, professional development, and career planning. Students will develop and present original projects and critique projects presented by others.

ENST 702: Environmental Science and Technology: Communication and Professional Development (2 credits; spring semesters)
Training in communication and professional development to prepare students to succeed in careers within the fields of environmental science and technology. Topics will include manuscript and technical writing, job search, communication with academic and non-academic audiences, multi-disciplinary collaboration, management, professionalism, leadership, ethics, and career opportunities. Course emphasizes practical training through facilitated discussions and critique practicums. 

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