College of Agriculture & Natural Resources
Environmental Science & Technology

Happy World Soil Day!

Soil is a major component of the Earth's ecosystem. It is the largest global carbon reservoir, and it is likely one of the most reactive to human disturbance and climate change.

December 5th is World Soil Day, and the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) reminds us to protect our soil.

“Soil is one of the world’s most neglected resources,” says David Lindbo, North Carolina State University soil scientist and president of SSSA. “We must take care of our soil for this generation, and all generations to come.” The tag line for the society is “Soils Sustain Life,” which “illustrates that without soil, we don’t have food, clothing, shelter, water—all the things that contribute to life,” he says.

Nick Comerford, a University of Florida soil scientist and SSSA member, wrote a SSSA blog post for World Soil Day explaining how soil cleans our water. “Soil is the largest filter on the planet,” says Comerford. Soil is a physical filter, taking out particulates. It also is a chemical reactor. Negatively charged soil acts like a magnet, pulling out positively charged ions and other pollutants that travel through the soil. And, microbes that live in soil help to clean water further by providing miniature water treatment plants in the soil.

SSSA manages a public information website on www.soils.org called Discover Soils where visitors can find information about the relationship between soils and health, soils and culture, and urban gardening, among other topics.

Happy World Soil Day!

Did you know that . . . . .

. . . . The United Nations General Assembly has declared December 5 of every year as World Soil Day and 2015 as the International Year of Soils to recognize that "soils constitute the foundation for agricultural development, essential ecosystem functions and food security and hence are key to sustaining life on Earth”.

How will you celebrate World Soil Day?

Maintained by the IET Department of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. © 2017. Web Accessibility